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Though we are one we are many March 23, 2020

Posted by P, J, or J in Uncategorized.
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This particular church building is where 25 years ago I attended both the smallest and largest communion service. The physically present congregation was just me but the Anglican priest presiding over the service stuck to the liturgy and so I read out loud, “Though we are many we are one body”.

It was of significance for me then, and again in these strange times of social distancing and virtual church. After appreciating the irony for a moment it dawned on me that I was not alone. Though I was one, I was part of the many. Countless millions were gathering that day around the world and sharing in variations of the same practice. Some doing so in large crowds, others in buildings no bigger than the one I was in, some in secrecy, some in solitude, but we were, and are all one body – the church.

You may have heard it before, the church is the people not the building. This particular building like many others will be empty now. The small chapel, despite it’s Mediterranean look, is in in England, at a Butlin’s holiday centre in Minehead, that at this time of year usually hosts Spring Harvest, an annual gathering of thousands of Christians packed together for a mix of singing, sermons, and seminars.

After Easter it would normally switch into full holiday mode, with up to 10,000 holiday makers at a time. (I worked at Butlin’s as a student, and for several years after, and it was there I became a Christian).

Neither, Spring Harvest not the holiday season is happening this year. When the Covid crisis has passed, many who are used to meeting in churches will have learned some new lessons about worshipping without walls, and many others will have encountered God through through conversations with neighbours at a distance of 2 metres (or latest advice), and via online communities where distance is less important.

However distant you feel from others today, you are not alone.

Photos in this post have been adapted from https://davedoeshistory.wordpress.com/2019/08/12/butlins-minehead-the-smallest-cutest-little-chapel-in-england/

The phrase “though we are many” comes from the Church of England Communion service, and in turn from St Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians 1Cor17:10

All   Though we are many, we are one body, because we all share in one bread.

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